Menu
discover new

  • Category: Thom Landers

I was a fat child. I was a fat teenager. In my mind I’m a fat adult (but that’s a different story). I was bullied when I was young. Never for being gay, but for being fat. It would get really upset, but then one day I began to view my bullies differently. Their words no longer affected me in the same way, which went a little something like this:


  • Bully: “Oi, you fat shit, can you even see your dick?”
  • Me: “Yes, actually, I can. Come back and talk to me when you can read. Don’t give me shit because your mum’s a crack head and your dad hates you”


Then I went to a fairly conservative boarding school from Year 11. I never really had to ‘come out’ at school. It was pretty obvious. I came in there with my Britney and Xtina albums blaring and pranced straight to the drama room. The boys just accepted me for who I was. What other choice did they have? I wasn’t going to change and if they put shit on me, I’d throw it right back in their faces. I’m very grateful for the acceptance that I got and I’m still friends with a lot of the boys to this day.


I understand my situation is somewhat unique (correct me if I’m wrong?) and I am not taking that for granted. There have been countless stories of kids, mostly in the United States, who are horrifically bullied to the point where suicide is the only option.


This sickens me. It’s disgusting and should never happen. These narrow-minded redneck cunts should be thrown in prison. What/who gives them the right to treat people like that?


The most horrible story I’ve heard recently was of Jeremy, the 14-year-old boy in New York state who took his life after years of awful bullying. When his sister went to her prom, the mob started chatting that he was a fag and better of dead. There are no words to describe who disgusting this is. The anger building up inside me as I write this is to the point of distraction.


The It Gets Better project has been phenomenal in its efforts to promote to kids that it does, indeed, get better and the bullying will end (not that it should have started in the first place). I don’t want to take away from their work at all, but I can imagine that it would be confusing for a teenager who is trying to see the light at the end of the tunnel when there are way more mixed messages external to this…


How can we have events that are so widely publicised and supported such as the Sydney Mardi Gras (I’m adopting its new name) or the various global Pride festivals but then marriage equality is still something a lot of countries are still fighting for? On the one hand, you have millions of people telling you that “it gets better” and you are surrounded by people that love and support you. On the other hand, you have governments that have it written into the laws of the land that formally state the love you feel isn’t normal nor recognised?


I’m extremely lucky that my friends and family have been 200% supportive and I’ve never encountered any form of homophobic bullying. However, having been a victim of bullying at a young age, I can totally sympathise and feel for these kids.


As well as having to deal with the unnecessary shit being put on them by bigots (read: retards), they are trying to rationalise their feelings about actually being gay. There will come a day where this won’t be necessary, however in a society that still purports relationships between males and females as ‘normal’, these kids will have to come to terms with the fact that they are, indeed, different.


Of course, bullying goes far beyond that which is directed at gays. I was working at an event recently for a client. A woman who seemed quite well-to-do and educated came up to me and asked me if the product was still Halal?


  • Me: Yes.
  • Woman: I think that’s disgusting.
  • Me: Excuse me?
  • Woman: I think it’s disgusting that it’s still Halal.
  • Me: Oh? Why?
  • Woman: Because it normalises shar’ia law in Western societies.
  • Me: I think there’s a massive difference between Halal practices and the much wider concept of shar’ia law.
  • Woman: Maybe in your mind, but not in theirs.


She then walked away and I was dumbfounded. What a massive fucking racist. Considering there was a Muslim family running the next stall, would she say that to their face? I certainly hope not. What’s worse is that the group she was with all agreed with her. This type of mob mentality makes it really hard to visualise a day when prejudice, racism and bullying is a thing of the past. Some people just don’t want to listen. They don’t want their views challenged and they are comforted by the fact that they are part of a group with similar beliefs and views.


Well you know what? I’m part of a group as well… A group that loves and accepts people not only despite of but because of their differences. Not only accepting it, but fully embracing and encouraging it.


If that means I’m going to hell, well then bitch get out of my way because that’s where the party’s at and I’m heading straight for the VIP. Get on board or shut the fuck up, because you’re making the world a dumber place every time you open your dirty mouth.




Tx

  • No comments found
supports16 mardigras2014   nycpride white Guidetogay.com accepts secure payments
for various features using
securepayment
rapidssl seal